Documentary PoeticsToggle Filters

Probing the strengths and limits of a poetics of fact
(sampled from Dee Morris)

kontrolledkhaos:

This show. Oh my God this show

(Source: sandandglass, via so-treu)

7.29.2014 |
148408

*absorbs negative energies and breaks them down into positive particles to feed my soul*

Like one of my favorite Buddhist practices. I try to remember my fears won’t protect meand that strength&happiness is an active thing i work toward (and fail to meet and dust off and aim for right again).

(Source: arabellesicardi, via cosmicspread)

7.29.2014 |
1828
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When minor characters who are also ethnic minorities start talking among themselves in their native tongues, they sometimes take advantage of their invisibility to say things. Sometimes they break the Fourth Wall and start ranting about the movie director. Sometimes, they spout random obscenities or natter about their lousy lunch. It’s all in not-English, so whatever they say doesn’t matter! And the actual translations of their lines can be a secret source of hilarity in films where actors are instructed to use a Gratuitous Foreign Language (GFL) in order to make a scene sound more authentic. When some Native Americans cast in Westerns were told to speak their own language to add some authenticity, these actors took the opportunity to crudely editorialize about their director, which allegedly resulted in Native American audiences (in)explicably cracking up laughing during scenes that were meant to be dramatic.

Minorities can be marginalized in film, but not silenced. (via salon)

(via processedlives)

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7.29.2014 |
2214
crepusculararchives:

"Mud Woman on the Banks" Watercolor, 5 x 7" © 2014 Conor Stechschulte. AVAILABLE

crepusculararchives:

"Mud Woman on the Banks" Watercolor, 5 x 7" © 2014 Conor Stechschulte. AVAILABLE

(via fantagraphics)


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7.29.2014 |
31
nayyirahwaheed:

nejma.

nayyirahwaheed:

nejma.

(via mambubadu)


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7.21.2014 |
2576
gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

(via newmodelminority)


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7.18.2014 |
8137
atomicdomme:

ida b wells was definitely grandmacore and also every other kind of core

atomicdomme:

ida b wells was definitely grandmacore and also every other kind of core

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)


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7.18.2014 |
2045
processedlives:

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean 
“The emotions, feelings, thoughts of the ‘underclass’ — such as these three men (c. 1903) are not recorded in books. But their history lives on in the memories of their grandchildren. It is through them that the oral historian ‘enters the minds and hearts of the ancestors’.”
Erna Brodber

processedlives:

Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History of the Caribbean

“The emotions, feelings, thoughts of the ‘underclass’ — such as these three men (c. 1903) are not recorded in books. But their history lives on in the memories of their grandchildren. It is through them that the oral historian ‘enters the minds and hearts of the ancestors’.”

Erna Brodber

(via so-treu)


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7.17.2014 |
222
dynamicafrica:

DOCUMENTARY: “The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords.”
In a world where segregation was back both by laws and social attitudes, it’s not surprise that the mainstream press in the United States served as a reflection of these ills.
Knowing firsthand the impact of words and images as weapons against their welfare, black people in the United States knew that left in the hands of racist publications, their representation, history, culture and identities would forever be at stake. Starting with communities and individuals of free black people in the 1800s, to the birth of more contemporary publications like Ebony, the power of images and the written word of black people by black people, and in the interests of black people, has always been an act of self-preservation.
This documentary brings to light a powerful and engaging account of American history that has been virtually forgotten: the story of the pioneering black newspapermen and women who gave voice to black America. 
Watch it here.
FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | PINTEREST | BLOG

dynamicafrica:

DOCUMENTARY: “The Black Press: Soldiers Without Swords.”

In a world where segregation was back both by laws and social attitudes, it’s not surprise that the mainstream press in the United States served as a reflection of these ills.

Knowing firsthand the impact of words and images as weapons against their welfare, black people in the United States knew that left in the hands of racist publications, their representation, history, culture and identities would forever be at stake. Starting with communities and individuals of free black people in the 1800s, to the birth of more contemporary publications like Ebony, the power of images and the written word of black people by black people, and in the interests of black people, has always been an act of self-preservation.

This documentary brings to light a powerful and engaging account of American history that has been virtually forgotten: the story of the pioneering black newspapermen and women who gave voice to black America. 

Watch it here.

FACEBOOK | TWITTER | INSTAGRAM | PINTEREST | BLOG

(via processedlives)


Hi-Res Photo

7.17.2014 |
404


STRAIGHT FLEXIN’/Flexin’ My Complexion (2014)
 // Kameelah Janan Rasheed // www.kameelahr.com

(via blackgirlsarefromthefuture)

7.13.2014 |
2820